Mexican Culture

Do's and Don'ts

Do’s

  • Be respectful and courteous, especially when in the company of parents or elders.
  • Try and be open to the friends and family of your Mexican counterpart. Mexicans are often very welcoming to friends of friends on the basis of small social connections. They will appreciate it if you are similarly open-hearted to their loved ones.
  • Refer to Mexican migrants living in the US without paperwork as “undocumented migrants”. Avoid using the term “illegal”.
  • Have an understanding of Mexico's cultural achievements and mention them when you see fit.
  • Try and offer your service to help with domestic duties or basic tasks whenever possible. Even if a Mexican declines your offer, it is polite to extend the gesture.
  • Be sure to thank Mexicans for their hospitality. It is the only gesture expected in return for their generosity.
  • Share stories from your country, home and family life. Mexicans love tales from other parts of the world. 


Do not’s

  • Never criticise the Virgin of Guadalupe or say anything about her that could be perceived as a slight (see ‘Catholicism in Mexico’ under Religion).
  • Do not stereotype Mexicans as ‘narcotraficantes’ (drug traffickers) or heavy drug consumers. Only a very small percentage of the population is engaged in such activity. Furthermore, consider that the current violence of cartels is driven by the Western consumption of drugs. Meanwhile, the Mexican consumption of illicit drugs is lower than US levels.1
  • Do not emphasise Mexico’s problems or seek to make people feel ashamed of them. Most Mexicans are disgusted by violence and want to redeem the reputation of Mexico in foreigners’ eyes. Furthermore, while they are very critical of their own nation’s issues, they do not need further judgement from outsiders – especially when this criticism is informed by stereotypes.
  • Do not criticise another person in public, or in earshot of others. Deliver all sensitive news privately to avoid embarrassing others.
  • Avoid referring to the United States as “America”. Mexico is also a North American country and some people can find it frustrating when the term is used solely to refer to those from the USA. Therefore, Mexicans may call Americans ‘estadounidenses’ instead of ‘americano’ in Spanish.
  • Do not imply that Mexicans are overcrowding the US or flooding the US border with undocumented immigration. In reality, the numbers of Mexican migration has been steadily declining.2
  • Do not imply that Mexicans are lazy. The population works more hours on average than any other OECD nation.3


[1] U.S. Department of State, 2016

[2] Pew Research Centre, 2015

[3] OECD, 2018

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Mexico
  • Population
    124,574,795
    [July 2017 est.]
  • Languages
    Spanish (de facto national language)
    Over 60 indigenous languages, including Nahuatl, Yucatec Maya, Mixtec, Zapotec, Tzeltal Maya, Tzotzil Maya and Otomi.
  • Religions
    Catholic Christian (82.72%)
    Evangelical Christian (6.74%)
    No Religion (4.68%)
    Unspecified (2.72%)
    Jehovah's Witness (1.39%)
    Protestant Christian (0.74%)
    Other (1.02%)
    [2010 census]
  • Ethnicities
    Mestizo (64.3%)
    Mexican white (15.0%)
    Detribalised Amerindian (10.5%)
    Other Amerindian (7.5%)
    Arab (1.0%)
    Mexican black (0.5%)
    Other (1.2%)
    Note: Mexico does not collect census data on ethnicity. All figures above are estimates.
    [Encyclopedia Britannica, 2010]
  • Cultural Dimensions
    81
    30
    69
    82
    24
    97
  • Australians with Mexican Ancestry
    7,414 [2016 census]
Mexicans in Australia
  • Population
    4,872
    [2016 census]
    This figure refers to the number of Australian residents that were born in Mexico.
  • Average Age
    33
  • Gender
    Male (47.9%)
    Female (52.1%)
  • Religion
    Catholic Christianity (63.2%)
    No Religion (19.0%)
    Christianity, ndf (3.0%)
    Not stated (2.8%)
    Other (12%)
  • Ancestry
    Mexican (65.9%)
    Spanish (12.0%)
    Australian (3.0%)
    English (2.9%)
    Other (16.2%)
  • Language Spoken at Home
    Spanish (79.9%)
    English (16.7%)
    Other (2.8%)
    Not stated (0.6%)
    Of those who speak a language other than English at home, 93.6% speak English fluently.
  • English Proficiency
    Well (93.6%)
    Not Well (5.5%)
  • Diaspora
    New South Wales (35.4%)
    Victoria (27.1%)
    Queensland (16.4%)
    South Australia (8.9%)
  • Arrival to Australia
    Prior to 2001 (25.2%)
    2001-2006 (22%)
    2007-2011 (48.4%)
Country https://dtbhzdanf36fd.cloudfront.net/countries/62/mx.svg Flag Country Mexico