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Australia
Vietnam
Hongkong
Istanbul
Prague
Amsterdam
Mexico
Cairo

Welcome to the

Cultural Atlas

More migration is occurring across the world than ever before in human history.

Australia circle Planet path
25 overseas

As of 2016, roughly 26% of Australian residents were born overseas. That means over a quarter of the population are first-generation migrants!

Almost half of all Australians (49%) have at least one parent born overseas.

Tree all Tree overseas

Considering that we live
in an increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse society, it becomes important to understand and respect other people’s backgrounds.

Respect

The Cultural Atlas
is aimed to help you do so. It provides comprehensive cultural information on Australia’s biggest migrant populations.

Over 90% of Australia’s first-generation migrant population was born in one of the countries published on the Atlas.

These are countries that you can see are darkened on the map.

However, before you proceed, it is important that you understand something

Cultural profiles should not be relied upon to form expectations or stereotypes of an individual’s behaviour based on their country of origin.

This information is purposed to give you an understanding of the dominant culture of countries so that you may gain insight into the kind of cultural and social environment a first-generation migrant from that country is likely to be familiar with.

Please remember that descriptions of dominant cultures are unlikely to be applicable to every individual. Countries contain many microcultures that differ from the dominant culture in identifying characteristics and people’s behaviour vary on an individual basis. This resource can only provide a general guideline.

All published content in the Cultural Atlas is the result of a collective effort between researchers, editors and members of the Australian community that have cross-cultural identities or familiarities.

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