Chinese Culture

Greetings

  • Handshakes are the standard, casual greeting. The grip tends to be lighter than the Western handshake and is also sustained for longer. 
  • In formal situations, people bow slightly or nod politely to greet one another formally. The bow is from the shoulders and should be greater if the person you are greeting has a higher status than you.
  • If seated, the Chinese will stand up out of respect when they are introduced to someone.
  • Always greet those that are older than you first.
  • Use a person’s family name and appropriate title to address them unless they have indicated that you can move on to addressing them on a first-name basis. 
  • Usually, only friends address one another by their given names.
  • Nicknames are used only between very close friends or lovers. 
  • To show a high level of respect, friends might use the terms ‘lao’ (old) and ‘xiao’ (young) with or instead of titles.
  • When first meeting a Chinese person in a rural area, it is common to be invited to join them for a meal. This is an old greeting that offers politeness, yet does not usually transpire into an actual meal.
  • It is considered impolite to greet a friend with a comment that could be perceived to have negative connotations, such as "You look tired".

Greetings

  • Handshakes are the standard, casual greeting. The grip tends to be lighter than the Western handshake and is also sustained for longer. 
  • In formal situations, people bow slightly or nod politely to greet one another formally. The bow is from the shoulders and should be greater if the person you are greeting has a higher status than you.
  • If seated, the Chinese will stand up out of respect when they are introduced to someone.
  • Always greet those that are older than you first.
  • Use a person’s family name and appropriate title to address them unless they have indicated that you can move on to addressing them on a first-name basis. 
  • Usually, only friends address one another by their given names.
  • Nicknames are used only between very close friends or lovers. 
  • To show a high level of respect, friends might use the terms ‘lao’ (old) and ‘xiao’ (young) with or instead of titles.
  • When first meeting a Chinese person in a rural area, it is common to be invited to join them for a meal. This is an old greeting that offers politeness, yet does not usually transpire into an actual meal.
  • It is considered impolite to greet a friend with a comment that could be perceived to have negative connotations, such as "You look tired".
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China
  • Population
    1,373,541,278
    [July 2016 est.]
  • Languages
    Mandarin (official)
    Cantonese
    Shanghainese
    Plus other dialects
  • Religions
    No Religion (52.5%)
    Folk Religion (21.9%)
    Buddhism (18.2%)
    Christianity (5.1%)
    Islam (1.8%)
    [2010 est.]
    Note: China is officially atheist.
  • Ethnicities
    Han Chinese (91.6%)
    Zhuang (1.3%)
    Other (7.1%)
    [2010 est.]
    Note: The Chinese Government officially recognises 56 ethnic groups including Hui, Manchu, Uighur, Miao, Yi, Tujia, Tibetan, Mongol, Dong, Buyei, Yao, Bai, Korean, Hani, Li, Kazakh, Dai and other nationalities.
  • Cultural Dimensions
    80
    20
    66
    30
    87
    24
  • Australians with Chinese Ancestry
    1,213,903 [2016 census]
Chinese in Australia
  • Population
    509,555
    [2016 census]
    This figure refers to the number of Australian residents that were born in China, excluding Hong Kong and Taiwan
  • Average Age
    35
  • Gender
    Male (44.4%)
    Female (55.6%)
  • Religion
    No Religion (63.2%)
    Buddhism (16.2%)
    Catholic Christianity (3.4%)
    Other (11.4%)
  • Ancestry
    Chinese (94.1%)
    English (1.8%)
    Russian (1.4%)
  • Language Spoken at Home
    Mandarin (65.3%)
    Cantonese (22.5%)
    Samoan (2.5%)
    Chinese (6.0%)
    Of those who speak a language other than English at home, 49.4% speak English fluently.
  • Diaspora
    New South Wales (48.9%)
    Victoria (29.4%)
    Queensland (8.5%)
    Western Australia (5.2%)
  • Arrival to Australia
    Prior to 2001 (38.2%)
    2001-2006 (23.7%)
    2007-2011 (33.7%)
Country https://dtbhzdanf36fd.cloudfront.net/countries/55/cn.svg Flag Country China